Monday, 19 June 2017

Aloo Masala Sandwich




Ramadan also romanized as Ramazan, Ramadhan, or Ramathan) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and is observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting to commemorate the first revelation of the Quran to Muhammad according to Islamic belief. This annual observance is regarded as one of the Five Pillars of Islam. The month lasts 29–30 days based on the visual sightings of the crescent moon, according to numerous biographical accounts compiled in the hadiths.
 
The word Ramadan comes from the Arabic root ramiḍa or ar-ramaḍ, which means scorching heat or dryness. Fasting is fardh (obligatory) for adult Muslims, except those who are suffering from an illness, travelling, are elderly, pregnant, breastfeeding, diabetic, chronically ill or menstruating. Fasting the month of Ramadan was made obligatory during the month of Sha'ban, in the second year after the Muslims migrated from Mecca to Medina. Fatwas have been issued declaring that Muslims who live in regions with a natural phenomenon such as the midnight sun or polar night should follow the timetable of Mecca, but the more commonly accepted opinion is that Muslims in those areas should follow the timetable of the closest country to them in which night can be distinguished from day.
 

While fasting from dawn until sunset, Muslims refrain from consuming food, drinking liquids, smoking, and engaging in sexual relations. Muslims are also instructed to refrain from sinful behavior that may negate the reward of fasting, such as false speech (insulting, backbiting, cursing, lying, etc.) and fighting except in self-defense. Food and drinks are served daily, before dawn and after sunset, referred to as Suhoor and Iftar respectively. Spiritual rewards for fasting are also believed to be multiplied within the month of Ramadan. Fasting for Muslims during Ramadan typically includes the increased offering of salat (prayers), recitation of the Quran and an increase of doing good deeds and charity. Ramadan is a time of spiritual reflection, improvement and increased devotion and worship. Muslims are expected to put more effort into following the teachings of Islam. The fast begins at dawn and ends at sunset. In addition to abstaining from eating and drinking, Muslims also increase restraint, such as abstaining from sexual relations and generally sinful speech and behavior. The act of fasting is said to redirect the heart away from worldly activities, its purpose being to cleanse the soul by freeing it from harmful impurities. Ramadan also teaches Muslims how to better practice self-discipline, self-control, sacrifice, and empathy for those who are less fortunate; thus encouraging actions of generosity and compulsory charity.

It becomes compulsory for Muslims to start fasting when they reach puberty, so long as they are healthy and sane, and have no disabilities or illnesses. Many children endeavor to complete as many fasts as possible as practice for later life. Each day, before dawn, Muslims observe a pre-fast meal called the Suhur. After stopping a short time before dawn, Muslims begin the first prayer of the day, Fajr. At sunset, families hasten for the fast-breaking meal known as Iftar.

In the evening, dates are usually the first food to break the fast; according to tradition, Muhammad broke fast with three dates. Following that, Muslims generally adjourn for the Maghrib prayer, the fourth of the five daily prayers, after which the main meal is served.

Social gatherings, many times in a buffet style, are frequent at iftar. Traditional dishes are often highlighted, including traditional desserts, and particularly those made only during Ramadan. Water is usually the beverage of choice, but juice and milk are also often available, as are soft drinks and caffeinated beverages.

In the Middle East, the iftar meal consists of water, juices, dates, salads and appetizers, one or more main dishes, and various kinds of desserts. Usually, the dessert is the most important part during iftar. Typical main dishes are lamb stewed with wheat berries, lamb kebabs with grilled vegetables, or roast chicken served with chickpea-studded rice pilaf. A rich dessert, such as luqaimat, baklava or kunafeh (a buttery, syrup-sweetened kadaifi noodle pastry filled with cheese), concludes the meal.



Over time, Iftar has grown into banquet festivals. This is a time of fellowship with families, friends and surrounding communities, but may also occupy larger spaces at masjid or banquet halls for 100 or more diners. For our 97th #Foodiemonday bloghop event we are back with the theme of  #Ramadanspecial and these mouthwatering Aloo masala sandwich is the perfect option to serve your family in Iftar time.

A tasty aloo masala packed between slices of bread lined with tongue-tickling chutney, the Masala Sandwich is surely one sumptuous snack that will keep you going for an hour or two. You can Toast it in a sandwich toaster. It is a typical trademark of street-side food. Check out the recipe below and Enjoyy!!! Ramadan Kareem :)


Ingredients

For The Aloo Masala
2 tsp oil
1/2 tsp mustard seeds
6 to 8 curry leaves 1 cup boiled, Peeled and mashed potatoes
1/4 tsp turmeric powder
1 tsp green chili paste
1 tbsp finely chopped coriander
salt to taste


For the Garlic Chutney
1 1/2 cups roughly chopped coriander
1/4 cup freshly grated coconut
1 tbsp chopped spinach
1 tbsp roughly chopped garlic
2 tbsp roughly chopped green chilies
Salt to taste
A few drops of lemon juice
1/4 cup water
 
Other Ingredients
8 bread slices
8 tsp butter
8 tsp garlic green chutney
1 tsp Sandwich masala
8 sliced onions
12 tomatoes slices
3 tsp butter for brushing and greasing

For Serving
Tomato ketchup
garlic green chutney

Method: 

1. Heat the oil in a deep non-stick pan and add the mustard seeds.

2. When the seeds crackle, add the curry leaves and sauté on a medium flame for a few second.

3. Add the potatoes, turmeric powder, green chili paste, coriander and salt, mix well and cook on a medium flame for another minute.

4. Divide the aloo stuffing into 4 equal portions and keep aside.

5. Apply 1 tsp of butter and 1 tsp of garlic green chutney on each bread slice and keep aside.

6. Place a slice of bread, with the buttered side facing upwards, on a clean, dry and flat surface.

7. Place one portion of the aloo masala and spread it evenly over it.

8. Arrange 2 onion slices, 3 tomato slices over the stuffing and sprinkle ¼ tsp of sandwich masala evenly over it.

9. Cover it with another slice of bread, with the buttered side facing downwards and press it lightly. Spread ¼ tsp of butter evenly over the bread slice.

10. If you want to toast the Sandwich Grease a sandwich toaster on both the sides using ½ tsp of butter.

11. Place the sandwich in the sandwich toaster and cook on a medium flame, till it turns brown and crisp from both the sides.